Quilt History 
Today's Quilt Historians
Underground Railroad
Women at Work





 



 

New Pathways into Quilt History written by Kimberly Wulfert, www.antiquequiltdating.com

Reproduction Fabric Review
The Pat L. Nichols III Collection 
by P&B Textiles

continued from page one. . . 
The main reproduction print below for each pattern is 'to scale.
'

One of the more pale colorways is a delicate print of tiny vines and flowers in light pink, blue, green and beige on a light ground. This print would have been sold for dress material as early as 1760 in England. They were popular well into the 1800s in America.

 

_____________________________________

original early 19th Century print 

The next group of colors is slightly darker than the palest. The French influence is seen in this mignonette print, meaning a tiny design repeated in a consistent pattern across the fabric. This print was roller printed with dress material in mind. The umbrella category for this type of tiny dress print is Geometric. Neats and diaper prints are the names that may be used to describe this print when it's not made in France. There is a beautiful yellow-gold color in this print, a color that we just don't get enough of in reproduction prints.

_____________________________________


original early 19th Century print 



No reproduction group of 19th century fabrics would be complete with out a plaid. This one is a on the small side made with three  shades of a color and a very light almost one shade of it for punch. This plaid can be used on quilts made throughout the century and well into the 1940s, when plaids get very large as the decade progresses. Civil War reproduction quilts beg for plaids such as these.


_____________________________________


original early 19th Century print 

A vine and picotage print is the largest of the smaller dress prints. This print has the neoclassical look that returns again and again in textile history, but was especially popular at the turn of the 18th century and for the next couple of decades.

 

Pat Nichol's saw an advertisement for this French print in an 1811 ad. This could have been made with blocks with metal pins or by a roller printing machine, also called a cylinder printer in the early years following its patent in 1783, by Thomas Bell.

_____________________________________


original early 19th Century print 



The darkest of the dress prints
 is a spotted vine with a leaf, no flowers. It could just as easily be used in a contemporary quilt or one using ethnic fabrics. It is a versatile and unique print.  Its origins are French, dating to the first quarter of 1800s, when darker grounds were in style. This print comes in the background colors of olive green, navy blue, brown and a dark red and the leaves are always black.


Pat designed a quilt pattern for her fabric line which you can find on P&B's website www.pbtex.com. A pattern is provided and it could be made by quilters in the beginner level, but wouldn't be a first or second quilt because of all those points. She named it Indian Meadow. It is a center medallion style quilt (59"X59") and includes a version of the Lady of the Lake block, which is a pre-1850 quilt block.

I would like to thank Pat L. Nichols and P&B for providing information and fabric for this review, and for making this sophisticated fabric collection.  

 

* Fabrics & Dyes

2005 - 2016 Kimberly Wulfert, PhD. Absolutely no copies, reprints, use of photos or text are permitted for commercial or online use. One personal copy for study purposes is permitted.

Fabrics & Dyes
Rugs & Textiles
Books & Reviews
Resource Links
Home



Visit my
online shop ...
for quilt history lovers! 

* Gifts & Jewelry,
* Books & Stationery,
* Archival Supplies, 
* DVDs,
* Quiltmaker Supplies.